What do I do if my flight is delayed/cancelled, and I have booked a Citylink ticket?

If you are a regular user of air travel, you are well accustomed to flight delays & cancellations. We here at Citylink completely understand that this can be a stressful situation for our customers coming from the airport.

So, if you book a seat with us and your flight is delayed, we will honour your ticket and put you on the next available service at no extra cost.

I’m concerned it will be busy and I won’t get a seat on the next service; what do I do?

We hear you! This is where our Manage My Booking feature comes to the rescue.

To help our customers have more flexibility and control over their travel plans, customers can now amend their booking up to 3 times prior to the scheduled service departure time.

Conditions:

  • You can amend your booking with Citylink up to 30 minutes before a service departs its first stop
  • We are happy to change the time and date of your booking, but we cannot change the destination.

If you need help amending your ticket, please click here.

Important to note:

• If you book another ticket with Citylink to guarantee your seat, the unused ticket is non-refundable.
• If you book another ticket with another provider, your Citylink ticket is non-refundable.

How to Spend a Summer Night in Galway

Galway is one of those places that when the sun starts to shine, you just don’t want to be at home. You’d much rather be out and about, taking in the sights and sounds of everyone enjoying the summer sun. Galway has some iconic places to spend a summer evening like Spanish Arch, Eyre Square and Woodquay – all with stunning views and perfect for a cheeky drink.

Summers in Galway can be electric. You’ll see tourists and locals mixing with culture and music and there’s always so much to do. We’ve decided to give you guys an idea of how to best spend a summer night in Galway and make the most of the upcoming warm and sunny days.

Dinner in the Dean

The Dean, a recently opened hotspot, is one of those iconic landmarks in Galway. Situated just off of Eyre Square, sitting on their rooftop terrace on a warm day while you eat is idyllic. Acknowledged as “a slice of boutique bliss in the heart of Galway, one of Europe’s friendliest cities”, The Dean and their rooftop restaurant, Sophie’s will offer any visitor a high-class, spectacular dining experience while you take in the view of Galway City.

The Dean, Galway.

Swan Out To Salthill

It’s almost criminal to be in Galway on a warm summer day or evening and not venture out to Salthill. Salthill on a warm day is world-class – you may even think you were in Spain. Taking the 401 city bus from Galway and getting off near the church in Salthill, you’re only a stones throw away from the beach. There’s a lot of cool places to stop and grab a bite, a drink or a coffee in Salthill. O’Reilly’s Bar has a stunning rooftop veranda where you can have a chilled drink and look out to the ocean.

Head down towards Blackrock Diving Tower and you’ll arrive upon up to Jungle Café where you can get delicious coffee and treats which are just perfect for a warm summers evening while listening to the waves.

The Promenade, Salthill.

Booze in the Blue Note

Galway’s Westend is where it happens. There are so many cool bars, restaurants and cafes. The Blue Note is a staple of the Westend’s bar scene. Just on the corner of William Street, the Blue Note is a perfect place to continue your day out in Galway in the sunshine. Sit in their beer garden, which is a hub of activity in the evenings and weekends and listen to some great local music – we can’t think of a better way to chill out!

According to galwaywestend.ie, the philosophy of the Blue Note is “drinks are something to enjoy while you talk to friends, not something you talk about.”

The Blue Note, Wiliam Street.

Get A Load of GIAF

July in Galway is massive. From mid to end July, you’ll meet some of the finest talent and artists both local and international under the roof of Galway International Arts Festival. GIAF 2022 kicks off on July 11th and is the first full programmed festival since 2019. Have a pint and ice-cream at the Festival Garden in Eyre Square, take in a world-class music act at the Heineken Big Top or see one of the street acts – there’ll be plenty of music, art, theatre and performances for everyone to go and see.

As proud Friends of the Festival, Citylink will be giving away tickets to shows during the festival so be sure to check out @citylinkireland on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for your chance to win!

Satori and Unfolding, Galway International Arts Festival.

Irish Citylink completes acquisition of GoBus!

With the acquisition of GoBus, Irish Citylink will become one of the largest private land transport companies in Ireland.

Irish Citylink, a wholly owned subsidiary of ComfortDelGro group headquartered in Singapore, has successfully completed the purchase of GoBus from its present owners. The acquisition marks a significant step forward for the company in expanding its network throughout Ireland. 

On reviewing the market to identify companies that offer an excellent level of service, it was imperative to choose a company whose values and reputation aligned with the core values and level of service Citylink is known for. GoBus epitomizes these values that are important to our company and passengers. 

David Conway, Regional Director of Irish Citylink, commented“Having navigated the challenges of COVID-19 and as we are rebuilding and expanding the range of services we offer to the traveling public, the addition of the GoBus network will enable us to provide significantly more options to both Citylink and GoBus customers. This enhanced network of services will encourage more people to travel via public transport and support our greater green agenda of moving towards a sustainable public transport network”.

The acquisition of GoBus fits into Citylink’s strategy to become the largest operator of intercity coach services in Ireland. GoBus’ convenient services and fleet of modern and comfortable coaches, alongside Citylink’s premium and reliable services, provide major opportunities for the company to become the largest intercity coach operator in Ireland. 

When asked about the acquisition, Frances Cahill, General Manager of Irish Citylink, commented, “This is just the beginning – The acquisition of GoBus brings so many new opportunities to the business in terms of employment, funding for local sponsorships, and the services we can provide for our passengers. We are absolutely delighted to bring two reputable transport providers together to provide an expanded network of routes and an even better customer experience for our current and future passengers!”

The stories behind Irish Citylink and GoBus

Irish Citylink first began right in the heart of Galway almost 20 years ago. The company’s distinctive blue and yellow coaches have become synonymous with high-quality, reliable, and affordable coach travel. In the beginning, Citylink ran up to 12 daily services between Galway and Dublin. Since then, they have expanded their business and network of routes to over 100 daily direct, express, and multi-stop services across all routes. Over 150 people are employed in the provision of Irish Citylink’s services in Galway, Dublin, Limerick, and Cork.

GoBus was established in 2009 and operates frequent and flexible coach services across three main routes serving Galway, Dublin, Cork, and Ballina. GoBus prides itself on offering flexibility and the best in comfort and safety on board.

Pairing GoBus with Citylink’s mission to connect Ireland’s towns, cities, villages, and airports across the nation by providing reliable travel is both ambitious and vital. Particularly as the need for public transport increases each year.

Irish Citylink operates a range of services in Galway, Dublin, Cork, Limerick, Clifden, Loughrea, Athlone, Ballinasloe, and more. The company currently carry over 28,000 passengers per week across all routes which is forecasted to surpass 35,000 later this year. With these numbers in mind, it is clear that transport is an essential and vital service in today’s society. With this acquisition, Irish Citylink is determined to create a reality where transport is more accessible in Ireland than ever before!

For more information on how this acquisition will affect Irish Citylink and GoBus’ customers, please click here.

Best Spots for a delicious Lunch in Limerick

At Citylink, we are proud to serve the city of Limerick. Limerick is a jewel along the Wild Atlantic Way and offers visitors some of the most scenic views and landmarks you can find across Ireland. Like King Johns Castle, St. Mary’s Cathedral, and some quality stores to do some shopping!

Citylink provides frequent services from Galway, Cork, and Dublin to Limerick, which gives a great opportunity to explore the Treaty City. Exploring any city cannot be done without sampling the local food offerings. So, we’ve created a list of our team’s favourite places to get some grub!

1. Freddys Bistro

This restaurant is located in a restored 19th-century building with a charming ambiance. The menu of Freddy’s bistro has a lot of delicate offerings. Still, their braised beef cheek and pork belly are mouth-wateringly good. All dishes are cooked to order, and the restaurant has a dedicated Coeliac and Vegan Menu. Bellissimo!

2. Café Rose

Café Rose in Limerick has something for everyone! They have a range of delicious light salads and meals to choose from, serving them in a casual dining atmosphere. They cater very well to vegan and vegetarian diners and have a delightful selection of cakes. Their macaroons are to die for!

3. Zest!

A top quality food production company based in Shannon with locations in the area, i.e., Limerick and Ennis, Zest! Provide excellent food items, including cakes, salads, and sandwiches. Located near People’s Park, this café is in a prime location for people touring around to get a sweet treat before having a nice walk in the nearby parks.

4. Fika Coffee

A multi-roasting coffee specialist based on Catherine Street in Limerick, which serves delicious coffee, including roasts by West Cork Coffee and Burren Coffee. This gem serves some top-quality coffees and pastries, which are perfect for anyone who wants a treat as they walk through the streets of Limerick. For non-coffee lovers, their iced tea is definitely worth the visit.

5. The Locke Bar

The Locke Bar is an award-winning eatery in the middle of Limerick’s Medieval Quarter. Open 7 days a week, The Locke Bar is known for its fresh daily special offerings and picturesque views of Limerick Harbour. Their website states, “It can be found on the original site of one of Limerick City’s oldest pubs dating back to 1724. Nearby are some of the city’s most historical landmarks such as St. Mary’s Cathedral, King John’s Castle & the Hunt Museum.”

If you enjoyed this, you might also enjoy our post of our favourite cafe spots in Galway City!

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The History of the Ha’penny Bridge

A beautiful structure with years of history lies just outside our Citylink office in Aston Quay: The Ha’penny Bridge. The Ha’penny Bridge which is the best known and most beloved of Dublin’s bridges, was the first iron pedestrian bridge in Ireland. The bridge was built in 1816 across the River Liffey in Dublin. The Ha’penny Bridge remained the city’s only pedestrian bridge over the Liffey for over 180 years until it was joined by the Millennium Bridge in 1999. The official name of the Ha’penny Bridge is the Liffey Bridge, however the nickname of the Ha’penny Bridge stuck because of the history. Keep reading to find out more.

The History of the Ha’penny Bridge

Originally called the Wellington Bridge (after the Dublin-born Duke of Wellington), the name of the bridge changed to Liffey Bridge in 1922 when Ireland gained independence. The Liffey Bridge remains the bridge’s official name to this day, although it is most commonly referred to as the Ha’penny Bridge.

Before the Ha’penny Bridge was built there were seven ferries, operated by William Walsh, across the Liffey. The ferries were in bad condition and Walsh was informed that he had to either fix them or build a bridge. The bridge was the idea of the Dublin Corporations’ s John C. Beresford. Despite the £3,000 cost, Walsh chose to construct a bridge.

Initially the toll charge was based not on the cost of construction, but to match the charges levied by the ferries it replaced. Each pedestrian who crossed paid a ha’penny, which is where the bridge got its famous nickname. A further condition of construction was that, if the citizens of Dublin found the bridge and toll to be “objectionable” within its first year of operation, it was to be removed at no cost to the city.

The toll was increased for a time to a penny-ha’penny (1½ pence), but was eventually dropped in 1919. While the toll was in operation, there were turnstiles at either end of the bridge. When the bridge opened in 1816 it was reported that an average of between 400-500 paying pedestrians crossed every day. Fast forward to now, approximately 30,000 pedestrians are crossing the bridge daily.

The Ha’penny Bridge celebrated its 200th birthday in 2016. However, it nearly did not reach 100 because in 1913, Dublin Corporation adopted plans to demolish the beloved Ha’penny Bridge and replace it with an art gallery over the river. The proposed gallery would showcase the work of Hugh Lane. The plans to build the gallery bridge were later scrapped, leaving the Ha’penny Bridge in place.

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Nostalgic drawing of the Ha’penny Bridge

Construction & Renovation

The Ha’penny Bridge is a single elliptical iron arch rising over three metres above high water at its peak. The bridge is 43 metres long and 3.66 metres wide. The ribs of the bridge were individually cast in 18 separate pieces by the Coalbrookdale Company and then shipped to Dublin. Once in Dublin, John Windsor – one of the company’s head foremen – oversaw construction.

The superstructure is reported to have remained remarkably sound since then, but when a survey revealed that work was needed on the railings and deck due to wear and tear, it was closed for a few months of renovation in 2001. 85% percent of the original cast iron was re-used in the renovation project.

Romance on the Ha’penny Bridge

The Ha’penny saw a spell of having its famous white railings decorated with ‘love locks’, or padlocks with lovers’ names on them. After an initial attempt to discourage couples from the practise in 2012 proved unsuccessful, 300 kilograms of locks were removed from the bridge in 2013 over concerns about damage to this protected Dublin structure.

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Love locks on the Ha’penny Bridge before they were removed in 2013

Conclusion

To conclude, there is a significant amount of history revolving around the Ha’penny Bridge. The bridge was build in 1816, over 200 years ago and was the only pedestrian bridge in Dublin for over 180 years until the Millennium Bridge was built in 1999. The original name was the Wellington Bridge, which was changed to the Liffey Bridge in 1922 when Ireland gained independence. This is still the official name, however, it is more commonly known as the Ha’penny Bridge due to the ha’penny toll charge for pedestrians crossing until 1919. The bridge was renovated in 2001 and the current bridge is 85% original cast iron. Don’t forget to like this blog if you enjoyed reading. You can also share this blog on Facebook or Twitter.

Other Citylink blogs you may enjoy:

Top 5 Beautiful Beaches in Galway

Travel to the Cliffs of Moher with Citylink & Lally Tours

3 Wild Atlantic Way Road Trips to take with Citylink

Free this weekend? Visit Athlone!

5 Hidden Gems to discover in Cork